Wouldn't it be nice if all New Yorkers could sit back and watch (or listen to) a U.S. Senate race debate between John Spencer and Hillary Clinton -- at a prime time hour on a broadcast outlet that everyone in the state could access? 

As word spreads that the ever-nationally ambitious Senator Clinton has refused to debate on prime time network affiliates or any national cable news outlets, it's clear that New York's junior U.S. Senator is unprepared (and unwilling) to debate in prime time.

But that's how incumbent-protection works and why campaigns in the United States require such a massive overhaul.

Hillary Clinton thinks she can win by not showing up.

For example:

Clinton has declined or avoided all national, regional or local radio debates.

Clinton has declined or avoided any web broadcast/blog debates.

Clinton has declined or avoided any town hall meetings.

Clinton has declined or avoided any prime time television debates.

Clinton has declined or avoided all New York City based prime time debates.

Clinton has declined or avoided all good government organization debates.

Clinton has declined or avoided debates on CNN, FOX and MSNBC.

Clinton has declined or avoided any prime time debates on network affiliates (ABC, CBS and NBC) for New York City, Rochester, Buffalo, Albany, Syracuse, Poughkeepsie or Binghamton.

Clinton has declined or voided any debates in Westchester or Long Island.

Clinton has declined or avoided debates on all Sunday morning political programs, including Meet The Press this weekend.

Senator Clinton will have her husband, former President Bill Clinton, appear on Meet The Press this Sunday as an obvious political surrogate -- filling a spot that undoubtedly would have been the Spencer/Clinton debate on Meet The Press this weekend.